General Durable Power of Attorney

The 6 Estate Planning Mistakes That You Don't Want To Make

We are in the business of helping people prepare and plan for the inevitable, so every year we write an article advising our clients about what not to do when it comes to death and disability planning.  The mistakes we have seen people make throughout the past 30 years we have been in practice have caused a lot heartache, stress, and money for our clients to correct.  

The Matching Game: Does The Driver's License Match The POA?

Financial institutions are becoming increasingly finicky about General Durable Power of Attorney (GDPOA) documents.  The GDPOA documents that we write at Roberson Law are 11 pages long in order to cover all of the bases, yet there are instances when we are still asked to provide additional substantiation to a bank that a GDPOA is valid.  

Will Your Financial Institution Accept Your Legal Documents?

Banks, brokerage firms, and investment companies are cracking down on the policies pertaining to a person's use of a General Durable Power of Attorney (GDPOA) to conduct account changes or transactions on behalf of the account holder.  Changing beneficiary designations can be an integral part of estate planning, and the task of doing so is sometimes executed by a person other than the actual account holder.

Make Sure Your POA is "Powerful"

Although Ohio law does not limit the age of a Power of Attorney (POA), financial
institutions often enforce their own rules about this document.

Unfortunately, because Ohio has no law requiring any business to accept a Power 
of Attorney, some banks, financial institutions, and real estate closing agents 
may refuse to accept a Power of Attorney due to its age.

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