POA

Two Legal Documents People With Onset Alzheimer's Disease MUST Get

A large portion of our client base consists of families affected by the horrible diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease.  When doing planning for a client with Alzheimer's Disease, we have to take into consideration the client's mental capacity to understand the documents being signed.  Remember that it is the client with the disease who must sign the estate planning documents; the person caring for the client may not sign the legal document on behalf of the client.  
 

My Name Is "On" Mom's Account, So Won't It Avoid Probate?

The title of this article is a common misconception that people have about avoiding probate.  A person will assume that just because he has been designated as his parent's Agent in his parent's Power of Attorney (POA) that he will have access to his parent's bank account after the parent dies.  The person will incorrectly assume that having his name listed on his parent's account will be enough to avoid probate.

Don't Get Caught With An Outdated POA

As many of our clients already know, a comprehensive general durable power of attorney is an effective estate planning tool to authorize another person to act on one’s behalf in the event of disability or incapacity.  In an effort to improve the usefulness of a power of attorney (“POA”), the laws regarding powers of attorney under the Ohio Revised Code were revised in March of 2012, in order to offer additional safeguards against abuse by the agent appointed in the POA and encourage third party acceptance.  

Elder Law Update: Legal Issues Affecting People With Alzheimer's Disease

According to the Alzheimer's Association statistics, in 2014, an estimated 5.2 million Americans of all ages have Alzheimer's disease. One in nine people age 65 and older (11 percent) has Alzheimer's disease, and of those with Alzheimer's disease, the vast majority (82 percent) are age 75 or older.  These startling statistics mean that there are millions of Americans who are in danger of not having the mental capacity to sign legal documents.  

Make Sure Your POA is "Powerful"

Although Ohio law does not limit the age of a Power of Attorney (POA), financial
institutions often enforce their own rules about this document.

Unfortunately, because Ohio has no law requiring any business to accept a Power 
of Attorney, some banks, financial institutions, and real estate closing agents 
may refuse to accept a Power of Attorney due to its age.

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